YouthWorker July/August 2012 Vol 28 No 6

COLUMNS
6    Youth Culture Update
Radical  Girl Scouts, declines in teen drinking and drugs, digital dangers, and all things  Katniss.
10    Culture Watch    Who  is Holy?: How Youth    Workers Can Balance    Relevance  and Holiness
By Walt Mueller
14    Campus Ministry    Whose  Kingdom Are You
Building?    A Question of Ministry  Motives
By Chuck Bomar
15    Soul Care Rites of Passage and     Cultural Markers
By David Olshine
16    Managing Your Ministry Making  Room  for Oldies
and Newbies
By Syler Thomas
18    10 Minutes in  God’s Word    Grace in Action
By Barry Shafer
48    Stirring It Up    Why Can’t Youth Ministry  Grow Up?
By Pete Ward

P. 22    Growing Up: The YWJ Roundtable on Emerging Adulthood What’s up  with today’s emerging adults, and  how  do we best  reach them? We asked Chap  Clark, Jeffrey Arnett and  Kelly  Lashly for  answers.
By Jennifer Bradbury

P. 26    The Power  of Choice Adulthood Comes by Making Wise Decisions
By Dr. Jeff Baxter

P. 28   Childhood vs. Adulthood
Robert Epstein  Says We lnfantilize Our Youth
By Carolyn Brown

P. 30   Stuck  in the Middle Confronting the Mid-Faith Crisis
By Lauren Winner

P. 32  Discipling Emerging Adults
An Interview with Richard L. Dunn and Jana L. Sundene
By Jennifer Bradbury

P 32. Intentionality Discipling Emerging Adults by Loving Them Proactively By Richard R. Dunn  and Jana L. Sundene

P. 36 Growing Up Isn’t What  It Used To Be Adults, Community Can Help Teens Navigate Path to Adulthood
By Amy Jacober

Expository Times Vol 123 No. 10 July 2012

469-478   Ewan Kelly The Development of Healthcare Chaplaincy
479-485    Bradly S. Billings “As some of your own poets have said”: Secular and non-canonical literature in the New Testament and some (post)modern parallels     486-493       Dohyung Kim  Genesis 37-50: The Story of Jacob and His Sons in Light of the Primary Narrative (Genesis ~ 2 Kings)
494-495     Trevor Jamison 5th August: Proper 13: 2 Samuel 11: 26 – 12: 13a; Psalm 51: 1-12; John 6: 24-35
496-497        Eric McKimmon  12th August: Proper 14: Psalm 130
497-499     Michael P. Knowles   19th August: Proper 15: 1 Kings 2:10–12; 3:3–14; Psalm 111; Ephesians 5:15–20; John 6:51–58
500-502     Rosemary King  26th August: Proper 16: John 6:56-69
503-506     Lorraine Darlow   All-Age Worship for the Summer
507-517        Book Reviews
518-519        Index of Books Reviewed
520         And Finally…

The Journal of Discipleship & Family Ministry Vol. 2 Issues 2 Spring/Summer 2012

Biblical and Theological Perspectives on Motherhood
02     EDITORIAL
Timothy Paul Jones
FEATURED ARTICLES
06    JAMES  MERRILL HAMILTON
A Biblical Theology of Motherhood
14     WILLIAM F. COOK Ill
When  Only One Spouse Believes: A Biblical Perspective
22     WAYNE SHEALY
The Church as Bride and Mother: Two Neglected Theological Metaphors
34     KEVIN SMITH
The Challenge of Matriarchy: Unique Challenges to Family Ministry in
African-American Churches
42    MARY  SOMERVILLE
A Substantial Grace: Effective Ministry to Single Teenaged Mothers
REGULAR FEATURES
56    RESEARCH  BRIEF: COUNSELING CASE STUDY: WHEN A PARENT  FAILS
Lilly Park
60     FAMILY PHYSICIAN: PREGNANCY LOSS
William Cutrer, M.D.
64    JDFM  FORUM: A DISCUSSION ON PASTORS  AND PARENTHOOD WITH KEN CANFIELD AND RANDY STINSON
Edited by Lauren Foster
66     BOOK  REVIEWS
Edited by Lilly Park
76     EQUIPPING THE GENERATIONS
96     SERMON:  RAISING CHILDREN, THE CHRISTIAN WAY
Peter J. Gentry

Christian Century Vol 129 No 13 June 27, 2012

6   LETTERS: Listening to Palestinians
7   The Editors: The Catholic bishops’ argument is weak
8  Century MArks: Eyes open in prayer, etc.
10  The end of impunity? John Kiess: The International Criminal Court issues a verdict
12  Hard choices in Egypt: Jayson Casper: Will Christians vote for the old regime?
22  A hopeful universalism:    Paul Dafydd Jones: Why we can hope everyone will be saved
28   Lending with grace: Jesse James DeConto: Breaking the cycle of payday loans
32   Ministry in the 21st Century: An Interview with Joyce Shin
NEWS
14 Churches more wary of partisan politics; Atheists, believers do good for different reasons; Nuns rap Vatican for ‘unsubstantiated’ charges; Vatican censures nun’s book on sexual ethics

IN REVIEW
36     Books
J. Nelson Kraybill: Revelations, by Elaine Pagels
William R. Burrows: The World’s Christians,
by Douglas Jacobsen
Amy Frykholm: The Better Angels of Our Nature,
by Steven Pinker
Miho Nonaka: Saint Sinatra and Other Poems,
by Angela Alaimo O’Donnell
44        Film
Steve Vineberg: Marvel’s The Avengers and Dark Shadows
47       Art
Lois Huey-Heck: Ruach, by Julie Elliot
COLUMNS
3        Editor’s Desk
John M. Buchanan: Grace before anything
20,  21  Living by the Word
Douglass Key
35       Faith Matters
Thomas G. Long: Future fatigue
45       American Soundings
Rodney Clapp: Animals in the kingdom

POETRY
11           Carol Gilbertson:Atitlan
24        Anya Silver: On our anniversary

New Yorker June 25, 2012

6  GOINGS ON  ABOUT TOWN
23  THE TALK OF THE TOWN
Adam Gopnik on the Olympic spirit; Boris johnson; opium; art for medics.

Ezra Klein    30   THE POLITICAL SCENE
Unpopular Mandate: When politicians change their minds.
Paul Simms    34  SHOUTS & MURMURS
Adversity Basketball
Ken Auletta    36  ANNALS  OF COMMUNICATIONS
Paper Trail: Apple,Amazon, e-books, and an antitrust suit.
Tad Friend    42  LETTER. FROM HOLLYWOOD
Funny Is Money: The business of being Ben Stiller.
Shani Boianjiu    58  FICTION
“Means of Suppressing Demonstrations”
THE CRITICS
BOOKS
James Wood       66   Sheila Heti’s ”How Should a Person Be?”
69   Briefly Noted
Jill Lepore       70  Barack Obama’s family history.
Sasha Frere-fones  75  POP MUSIC
Albums from Norah Jones and Fiona Apple.
Peter Schjeldahl 78  THE ART WORLD
A George Bellows retrospective.
Emily Nussbaum   80   ON TELEVISION
“The Newsroom

POEMS
W  S. Merwin     52   “Lear’s Wife”
Linda Pastan    62   “Fireflies”

TIME Vol 180 No 1 June 2012

41 Editor’s Desk
BRIEFING
9 Verbatim
10 LightBox Unhappy workers in Spain
12 World Egypt’s pain and Greece’s prospects
14 Nation
Our Obama-Romney scorecard
16  Profile
A nun takes on the Vatican
18  Economy
The sky-high cost of baggage fees
19  Health & Science When athletes must prove their gender
20  Milestones
We lose Rodney King and a football star
COMMENTARY
21 Viewpoint Massimo Calabresi on why Europeans could decide the 2012 U.S. presidential contest

22 I  Curious Capitalist
Rana Foroohar on negotiating the bond bubble

24 ln the Arena Joe Klein on the undecided heartland

26  The American Dream: A Biography
It has seen better days, but it’s an idea that has shpaed the nation’s desitny from the beginning-and can point the way to the future
Jon Meacham

40    Votes Who Matter
Purple voters. The Kennedy Generation. Meet the people Barack Obama and Mitt Romney must win over to take the White House
Mark Penn

44 China’s Apple Crush
Workers in Chines ACtories already mkae all those iPhones and iPads. Someday soon they may but most of them.
Hannah Beech

Near Eastern Archaeology Vol 75 Is. 2 June 2012

PG 68     FACE TO FACE WITH  THE PAST: Reconstructing a Teenage Boy from Early Dilmun
Alexis T. Boutin, Gloria L. Nusse, Sabrina B. Sholts, and Benjamin W. Porter

Since 2008, the Dilmun Bioarchaeology Project has analyzed the human  skeletal remains  and artifacts that Peter B. Cornwall excavated from Bahrain in the
1940s, now held in the Hearst Museum of Anthropol­ ogy. One mode of interpretation and dissemination pursued by the DBP team is forensic  facial recon­ struction. The subject of the first reconstruction is a twelve- to fifteen-year-old  male who lived during the Early Dilmun period (ca. 2050-1800 B.C.E.).  The resulting sculpture  incorporates skeletal data about his identity and health as well as visual cues grounded in archaeological and sociohistorical contexts. It will be one of two reconstructions at the center of a travel­ ing museum exhibition beginning in 2013. The goal of the exhibition is to present members of past soci­ eties to the interested public in a tangible  fashion that encourages empathy and an appreciation of our shared humanity.

PG 80    WHAT’S THE POOP ON ANCIENT TOILETS AND TOILET HABITS?
Jodi Magness

Today we view the ancient world through  a highly sanitized lens. In reality, the Roman world was a filthy, malodorous, and unhealthy place. This article focuses on ancient toilet habits and toilet facilities, with spe­ cial consideration of the situation in Roman Palestine and rabbinic Judaism. The toilet habits at Qumran­
where excrement was considered  a source of impurity, defecating on the Sabbath was prohibited, and the sectarians practiced  toilet privacy-are  excep­ tional for antiquity. In contrast, rabbinic Judaism did not associate excrement and defecation with ritual impurity. The final sections of the article discuss the toilet in the temple of Jerusalem and its priests’ toilet habits, as well as Jesus’ position  on the impurity of excrement.

88    TEL BET YERAH: Hub of the Early Bronze Age Levant
Raphael Greenberg, Sarit Paz, David Wengrow, and Mark Iserlis

During more than one thousand years at the dawn of written  history, ancient  Bet Yerah emerged  and grew to be a focal point of Early Bronze Age interac­ tion. Established as a large village circa 3500 B.C.E., Bet Yerah was to become the prime city of the Jordan Valley, with massive fortifications, paved streets, and trade connections extending across the Levant and to Dynastic Egypt. One of the most ambitious buildings of the ancient Levant, the Circles Building or Granary, was founded near the summit of the mound.  Partial abandonments in the early third millennium signify a local crisis that  corresponded with the influx  of immigrants  from the distant north; they introduced the Khirbet  Kerak culture  to the site. After centu­ ries of shifting fortunes, Bet Yerah finally succumbed and was only sporadically inhabited in later times, as Hellenistic Philoteria  and Umayyad al-Sinnabra. In our times it has become a heritage site associated with labor Zionism and the birth of the Kibbutz. This article tells the story of the Bronze Age city, based on extensive excavations since the 1930s, including new research and excavations since 2003.

PG. 108 THE SCULPTURES OF ALACAHOYUK: A Key to Religious Symbolism in Hittite Representational Art

Piotr Taracha
This article presents a new interpretation  of the monu­ mental  sculptured friezes  of the Sphinx  Gate of Ala­ cahoyiik in northern Anatolia,
an important site of the Hittite Empire. Historical  and cultural arguments  sup­ port a date in the second half of the thirteenth century B.C.E.
for the Sphinx Gate. On the basis of a comparison of the scenes with other  representations in Hittite  art, it is argued that the cult and hunting
scenes reflect the concept of the main triad of the Hittite state pantheon: the sun-goddess, the storm-god,  and the tutelary god of the countryside.
At the same time, the lower frieze on the West Tower depicts the royal couple officiating, pre­ sumably during an actual local festival. An identification
of Alacahoyiik with the sacred city Arinna is proposed. The Alacahoyiik  sculptures may pertain to the Great Festival of Arinna, a festival attended by the
royal couple.

PG. 116 UNSEALING TELL EDFU, EGYPT: Who Was a Local Official and Who Was Not?

Nadine Moeller

The two most frequently encountered sealing motifs discovered at Tell Edfu show decorative  patterns that make  the  identification of their respective owners extremely difficult, in contrast to private name sealings dating to the late Middle Kingdom and early Second Intermediate Period  (ca. 1770-1650 B.C.E.)  that  offer names and titles of officials operating  on the local and national level. Decorative motifs per se do not reveal any details about their owners apart from the fact that they were part of the administrative system, probably belong­ ing to the lower tier of officials who remain  relatively invisible in the majority of textual records. However, by analyzing the archaeological context and the back-types of such sealings, some information  can be gained about their  respective  owners,  and it is possible  to consider questions as to whether they were local officials or simply sending sealed commodities to Edfufrom  elsewhere.

PG. 126  REVIEWS
Glorious Mud! Ancient and Contemporary Earthen Design and Construction in North Africa, Western Europe, the Near East, and Southwest Asia
Aaron A. Burke