English Journal Vol 102 No 4 March 2013

7   Call for Manuscripts
11   From the Editor
Ken Lindblom
13   High School Matters
Breaking Free
Katie Greene

TEACHING ENGLISH IN THE AGE OF INCARCERATION

16   EJ in Focus
Teaching English in the Age of Incarceration
Marc Lamont Hill, Guest Editor
Incarceration rates are increasing at alarming  rates, and schools are profoundly affected by the logic and imperatives  of mass incarceration. English teachers must take action.

19   A World without Prisons: Teaching Confinement Literature and the Promise of Prison Abolition
Marc Lamont Hill
Exposing students  to canonical and contemporary slave, political, personal, and
non-carceral confinement literatures provides space for discussing important issues of social justice.

24   Teaching in the Dark: The Promise and Pedagogy of Creative Writing in Prison
Deborah Appleman
Creative writing can unlock creative potential, foster students’ love of language, and offer a powerful outlet for self-expression.

31   Songs of the Caged Birds: Literacy and Learning with Incarcerated Youth
Peter Williamson, Megan Mercurio, and Constance Walker
Teachers plan and reflect on practices that can make a difference in the lives and literacy of incarcerated youth.

38   Building a Collective Understanding of Prisons
Larissa Pahomov
Pairing Night by Elie Wiesel with Finding Freedom  by Jarvis Jay Masters, a death-row inmate,  encourages a critical examination of the purposes and effects of imprisonment.

45   Using To Kill a Mockingbird as a Conduit for Teaching about the School-to-Prison Pipeline
Steffany Comfort Maher
Using a response-based cultural studies approach, the author engages students  in contemporary  issues of incarceration: single-parent homes, lynching and racial discrimination, the criminal  justice system, and poverty.

53   Incarceration, Identity  Formation, and Race in Young Adult Literature: The Case of Monster versus Hole in My Life
Tim Engles and Fern Kory
Contrastive readings ofYA novels can help students  understand  the role of race in culture and contribute  to students’ process of identity  formation.

59   Politely Disregarded: Street Fiction, Mass Incarceration, and Critical Praxis
Karin Van Orman and Jamila Lyiscott
Street fiction is risky to teach, but it offers opportunities for meaningful, critical thinking about important voices that resonate with many  students  and populations  that have been historically marginalized.

67   “I’m a reader”: Transforming Incarcerated Girls’ Lives
Kristine E. Pytash
Unproductive tensions are evident between a young incarcerated woman’s in-class practices and her literary life outside the classroom.

GENERAL INTEREST
74   An Online Writing Partnership: Transforming Classroom Writing Instruction
JaneS. Townsend, Allan Nail,Jennifer Cheveallier, and Angela Browning
Witness the evolution of a successful, innovative  program in which preservice English teachers serve as writing consultants for eleventh-grade English students.

82   International Quidditch: Using Cultural Translation Exercises to Teach Word Choice and Audience
Donelle Ruwe
Focusing students on British-to-American cultural translation problems in the Harry Potter series encourages students  to understand connotation, denotation, and other important  characteristics of English language.

89   Changing the Lens: The Necessity of Visual Literacy in the ELA Classroom
Christ Gilbert
An analysis of Ebony and GQ magazine covers exposes race and class narratives and encourages students  to become more aware of the ways in which other images connote cultural information.

POETRY

15   Saturday Visitation
Janet Atkins
95   Three Poems
Jennifer Case

COLUMNS
98   Adventures with Text and Beyond
Education for Empowerment  The Link between Multiple Literacies and Critical Consciousness
Scott Hubbard

103   Mentoring Matters: Mentoring in Community
Rachel Malchow Lloyd

107   Professional Writing in the English Classroom
Professional Collaborative Writing: Teaching, Writing, and Learning-Together
Jonathan Bush and Leah Zuidema

111   Research for the Classroom
To Read or Not to Read: Five Approaches to Teaching Shakespeare

Brandon Shoemaker

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